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Stanley Wilder
swilder2@uncc.edu
Phone: 704-687-3110
Director's Blog  
 
Build-it part 2:
 
I have no interest in replicating the ample literature devoted to “build or buy” software decisions. To be honest, I’ve got nothing to contribute until the discussion turns to research library applications. 
 
My ideas are my scars on this subject: I believe that the moment has passed for software projects directed at improving the general search infrastructure in the form of open source discovery services or Integrated Library Systems.  I believe that there was a verifiable niche here, a time when commercial developers shied away from innovation. They made the mistake of following their customers instead of the power/simplicity strategy of Google. But no longer, and now individual libraries, even consortia of libraries cannot compete in this sphere. 

Sincerely,





Build-it part 1:
 
I know that there are research libraries that don’t consider the invention of new IT tools part of their core mission, but I don’t pretend to understand why. The web of interconnecting technologies supporting library services and collections is a permanent problem in need of constant attention. To say nothing about IT-based opportunities for entrepreneurship, collaboration and innovation.
 
For build-it research libraries, the primary question is strategic: how to decide where to start? How to deploy your precious IT development resources? I have tentative thoughts to set down here, but I would love to get your take on this. 

Sincerely,





The Library has been discussing Open Access (OA) with the Faculty Advisory Library Committee (FALC), with a mind to raising awareness of the chronic and financially unsustainable crisis in academic journals.
 
OA is a complex concept growing murkier by the day. If the FALC decides to take it up, it will be to advocate for a “green” version that carries no requirement for faculty to contribute to OA journals, does not effect promotion and tenure standards or procedures, and does not lead faculty to predatory journals that charge costly author fees and offer no editorial or peer review. 

Sincerely,