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Louise Woods Papers

Filing title: 
Woods (Louise) Papers

Papers of Louise Woods
MS0369

Summary Information

Repository
J. Murrey Atkins Library Special Collections, UNC Charlotte
Creator
Woods, Louise S.
Title
Louise Woods papers
ID
MS0369
Date [inclusive]
1967-2006
Extent
12.0 Linear feet
Language
English
Abstract
Contains a wide assortment of papers, reports and records accumulated by Louise Woods, while serving as the representative from the fourth district on the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Board of Education, in Charlotte, North Carolina, from 1995-2005.

Preferred Citation note

Louise Woods Papers. J. Murrey Atkins Library Special Collections, University of North Carolina at Charlotte.

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Biographical/Historical note

Biographical note: Louise Woods graduated from Duke University, and later earned a master's degree in social work from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Mrs. Woods came to Charlotte in 1967 and has been involved in community activities on Charlotte's eastside ever since. She has participated with the PTA, the League of Women Voters (serving on its education committee), her church and also worked for the Charlotte Baptist Children's Home. Before her election to the Charlotte Mecklenburg Board of Education, Mrs. Woods worked as a social worker and parent educator. Mrs. Woods was elected to the Board of Education in 1995 (though she had run for election in earlier years) and was the representative from District Four. Mrs. Woods was among the first to be elected to represent a district, because in previous years members were always elected "at-large." Among the issues that she dealt with as a member of the CMBE were the Capacchione court case (on which she voted to go to court to resolve the issue of student assignment); a rapidly growing student population (the construction of new schools could barely keep up with the increasing number of students); increasing ethnic diversity (in 1995 when she first came to the Board, the district's student population had about two percent Hispanic children, but by the end of her tenure, it had grown to over fifteen percent); equitable school funding; academic extra-curricular after-school activities; and the availability of advanced placement courses in each school. Along with the increasing ethnic diversity of the region, the number of Asians moving into Charlotte and Mecklenburg County grew dramatically, bringing with them dozens of different languages. In addition, the percentage of students performing at grade level steadily increased. In addition to dealing with a host of educational issues, Mrs. Woods also served on several school board committees, including the Personnel Committee (which she chaired), the Board Equity Committee, the Policy Committee, the Safety Committee, and she was the Board Liaison to the Planning Committee. She also served on the Board of Directors of the North Carolina School Board Association. Mrs. Woods' completed her career on the CMBE in November of 2005.

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Biographical/Historical note

Historical note: Education in Mecklenburg County began in 1790 with the establishment of the Sugar Creek School House. The structure for this parochial school still exists over two hundred years later, on the grounds of the Sugaw Creek Presbyterian Church at the intersection of North Tryon Street and Sugar Creek Road. Public education arrived in the area in 1882, when voters approved a tax for the support of a school system, and also voted for a board of school commissioners. The newly formed Board of School Commissioners appointed T. J. Mitchell as its first superintendent. The first public school, known as South School was located in the barracks of the Carolina Military Institute, at the intersection of East Morehead Street and South Boulevard. South School provided a curriculum for grades one through ten. The eleventh grade was added in 1908, and the twelfth grade in 1925. Another school for African-American children, known as Myers Street School, was also organized in 1882. By this time there were also several schools in Mecklenburg County—a school system that was separate from the Charlotte city schools. In 1913, Superintendent Dr. Harry Harding established the first junior high school in North Carolina, by converting Alexander Graham High School into a junior high—now known as Alexander Graham Middle School. Seven years later, in 1920, the Charlotte School System purchased its first school buses. Significant changes came to the Charlotte and Mecklenburg schools systems by the 1940s. This was a time when education experts began reconsidering the ways in which schools were being administered. By the mid 1940s some of the schools in the county were being consolidated into the city school system, and by 1949 the Institute for Government at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill recommended consolidation between cities and counties. At about the same time, the Charlotte Chamber of Commerce conducted a study that made the same conclusion. This process was not completed in Mecklenburg County until eleven years later. During the decade-long debate over city/county school consolidation, the US Supreme Court issued its ruling on one of the greatest and most significant court cases relating to public education. This was the Brown vs. Board of Education case, in which the Supreme Court decreed in 1954 that the educational doctrine of separate but equal is inherently unequal. This was a sea change in the administration of public schools vis-à-vis race, and had a major impact on the CMS system as well as schools systems throughout the country. In spite of the court order, school desegregation did not happen smoothly. The minority students who first made their way into predominantly white schools encountered considerable resistance. Other cases related to matters of race include the Swann vs. CMBE case, in which Vera and Darius Swann filed suit in 1965 in an effort to force the schools to admit James Swann to the school closest to his residence (a predominantly white school). The US District Court ruled in this case that the CMS system must use “all known ways of desegregation, including busing,” to integrate schools. This case (which the US Supreme Court upheld in 1971) was another landmark case in public education, and originated in Charlotte. In 1975, Judge McMillan, of the US District Court, removed the CMS system from court supervision on school desegregation, under the belief that the CMS had satisfied the conditions of his court ruling. Ultimately, the most effective way that the school system was able to deal with the issue of school desegregation and integration was the establishment of “magnet schools” a program that Superintendent John Murphy started in 1992. Magnet schools are newly built schools, equipped with the latest in computer technology, usually built in minority neighborhoods, with the intention of attracting white students from affluent neighborhoods into schools where most of the students are disadvantaged minorities. Another round of litigation emerged in 1997, when the CMS System declined the enrollment application of Christina Capacchione at a magnet school, which her parents alleged was because of her race (Capacchione is white). The Charlotte Mecklenburg Board of Education asserted that Capacchione had been denied enrollment at her school of choice as a result of its established student assignment policies, which they claimed were made without regard to race. Other interested parties joined the Capacchiones, including Grant and Belk; and the courts revived the precedents that were established as a result of the Swann case. The case was argued in a district court in North Carolina, then it was appealed to a United States Court, then a US Court of Appeals, and finally to the US Supreme Court. The US Supreme Court declined to hear the case, making the decision of the US Appeals Court final. The Appeals Court decided in November of 2001 that the while it approved of certain aspects of the CMBE’s approach to assigning students to schools, it ultimately agreed with the Capacchione’s complaint and ruled in their favor. [Interview with Louise Woods, August 24, 2007.]

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Scope and Contents note

As a member of the CMS (Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools) governing board from 1995 to 2005, the Louise Woods Papers contain a large assortment of documentation concerning CMS and public education (many of the papers in this collection predate her election to the board). The range of issues with which she dealt was wide and varied; and included such things as violence in schools, declining standards and test scores, peer pressure, drug abuse, budgetary problems, school overcrowding, the increasing drop-out rate, racial profiling, poverty and especially racial issues like desegregation, integration and busing. Though this collection contains a wide array of records, the papers reveal that the greatest and most over-riding issues that the school board dealt with were those pertaining to race—either directly or indirectly. As a public school system, courts and legislatures required the Charlotte Mecklenburg School system make every effort to racially integrate its students. Doing so has often required assigning students to schools other than those in their own neighborhoods, and busing them, in some cases, far from home. Busing was a very controversial issue and the school board responded by building “magnet schools” – new school buildings built in minority neighborhoods, with the latest in computers and technology – in an effort to attract white students to those schools without forcibly busing them. Approximately one cubic foot of Woods’ records concern court cases in which the parents of Christina Capacchione filed suit against the Charlotte Mecklenburg Board of Education when the school system declined her application to a magnet school. Capacchione had been twice denied admission, which her parents alleged because of her race (Caucasian). Other cases related to this one include litigation introduced by Belk, Grant, and Swann; whose legal briefs are found in the Capacchione files. A topic related to this court case is the student-school assignment, and several files in this collection pertain to that issue. Another issue extensively documented in this collection is the issue of rapid population growth in Charlotte in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. School over-crowding was a constant problem, as building and renovation could hardly keep up with the ever-growing number of school children.

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Administrative Information

Publication Information

J. Murrey Atkins Library Special Collections, UNC Charlotte 2007

9201 University City Blvd.
Charlotte, NC, 28223
704-687-1170
spec-coll@uncc.edu

Conditions Governing Access note

Collection is open for research.

Conditions Governing Use note

Some material may be copyrighted or restricted. It is the patron's obligation to determine and satisfy copyright or other case restrictions when publishing or otherwise distributing materials found in the collections.

Immediate Source of Acquisition note

Acquired from Louise Woods, in 2006.

Processing Information note

Processed by Robert A. McInnes, November 2006.

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)

  • Charlotte-Mecklenburg Board of Education.
  • Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools.

Personal Name(s)

  • Woods, Louise S.

Subject(s)

  • Busing for school integration--North Carolina--Charlotte
  • School boards--North Carolina--Charlotte--History

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General note

APPENDIX OF ACRONYMS: The nature and complexity of public education is such that documenting the trends has generated the increasing use of acronyms. An appendix of acronyms useful to understanding this collection: ABC = “The ABCs program, which was initiated in 1996, is North Carolina’s primary school reform program with the goals of providing strong local school accountability, an emphasis on the mastery of basic subjects and as much local control as possible.” CMS media release, Aug 5, 2004. ADA = Average Daily Attendance ; ADM = Average Daily Membership ; AG = Academically Gifted ; AJES = Amay James Elementary School ; AP = Advance Placement ; APIP = Advanced Placement Initiative Programs ; ARJH = Albemarle Road Junior High School(?) ; ASEP = American Sports Education Program ; AVID = Advancement Via Individual Determination ; AYP = Adequate Yearly Progress ; BED = Behaviorally and Emotionally Disabled ; BEDP = Basic Education Development Program ; BEP = Basic Education Program ; BOCC = Board of County Commissioners ; BOE = Board of Education ; BSC = Balanced Scorecard ; CAT = California Achievement Test ; CBAC = Capital Budget Advisory Committee ; CCSSO = Council of Chief State School Officers ; CED = Committee for Economic Development ; CIE = Current Issues in Education ; CIP = Capital Improvement Program ; CMBE = Charlotte Mecklenburg Board of Education ; CAN = Capital Needs Assessment ; COE = Centers of Excellence ; COPS = Cost per seat ; CRSS = Center for Reform of School Systems ; CUBE = Council of Urban Boards of Education ; CWIC = City within a City ; DEAR = Drop Everything and Read ; DOP = Drop-out Prevention ; DSS = Department of Social Services ; EBAC = Educational Budget Advisory Committee ; EC = Exceptional Children ; EEO = Equitable Educational Opportunity ; EOG = End-of-Grade ; ELP = English Language Proficiency ; ERS = Educational Research Services ; ESL = English as a Second Language ; ET = Education Trust ; FAC = Faculty Advisory Council ; FLES = Foreign Language in the Elementary Schools ; FRLP = Free/Reduced Lunch Program ; FUME = Families United for North Mecklenburg Education ; GRADE = Group Reading And Diagnostic Evaluation ; HELP = Helping Empower Local People ; IB = International Baccalaureate ; ISEF = International Science and Engineering Fair ; ISS = In-school suspension ; JFAC = Joint Finance Appropriations Committee ; LABP = Local Accountability Bonus Program ; LEP = Low English Proficiency ; LES = Local Education Service ; LGEM = Leadership and Global Economics Magnet ; LWV/CM =League of Women Voters/Charlotte Mecklenburg ; MPIB = Myers Park Baccalaureate Program ; MRSA = Methicilin Resistant Staphylococcus Aurus ; NAEP = National Assessment of Educational Progress ; NCLB = No Child Left Behind ; NSBA = National School Boards Association ; NCAGT = North Carolina Association for the Gifted and Talented ; NCSCOS = North Carolina Standard Course Of Study ; NCSBA = North Carolina School Boards Association ; NSBA = National School Boards Association ; PAGE = Parents for the Advancement of Gifted Educational ; PARS = PA Retirement System ; PCST = Project Charter Support Team ; PEP = Principal Evaluation Program ; RGA = Reform Governance in Action ; SAS = Student Accountability Standards ; SAVE = Students Against Violence Everywhere ; SES = School of English Studies ; SFUSD = San Francisco Unified School District ; SHIP = Students with High Intellectual Potential ; SOAC = State of Available Capacity ; SOS = Save Our Schools ; SRP = Supplemental Retirement Plan ; SSS = Student Service Specialists (school psychologists) ; SY = School Year ; TAG = Talented and Gifted ; TANF = Temporary Aid to Needy Families ; TD = Tabular data ; TEACCH = Treatment and Education of Autistic and Related Communication Children ; TIMS = Transportation Information Management System ; TIP = Talent Identification Program ; TQE = Total Quality Education ;

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Collection Inventory

Series I: Board of Education

Box Folder

Agendas

1 1

Annual Communications 2003-2005

1 2

Board Members' Manual

1 3-4

Board Members' Rights, Responsibilities and Character Development Handbook

1 5

Budgets

Box Folder

1984-1985

1 6

1989-1990

1 7

1991-1992

1 8

1996-1997

1 9

1997-1998

1 10

1998-1999

1 11

2001-2002

1 12

2002-2003

1 13

2003-2004

1 14

2004-2005

1 15

2005-2006

1 16

Committees

Box Folder

Bond Oversight Committee

1 17

Citizens Capital Budget Advisory Committee

1 18

Committee of 25

1 19-21

Comprehensive School Planning Committee

1 22

Curriculum Committee

1 23

Educational Budget Planning Committee

1 24

Education Strategic Planning Committee

1 25

Equity Committee

1 26

Future School Planning Task Force

1 27

Long Range Facilities Master Plan Advisory Committee

1 28

Personnel Committee

1 29

Planning Liaison Committee

1 30

Policy and Personnel Committee

1 31

Reading Committee

1 32

School Building Solutions Committee

1 33

Student Assignment Oversight Committee

1 34
Box Folder

Minutes 1989-2005

1 35

Policies & Regulations, Vol. I

1 36

Policies & Regulations, Vol. I

2 1

Policies & Regulations (Addenda)

2 2-3

Policies & Regulations, Vol. II

2 4-5

Policies & Regulations (Addenda)

2 6-7

Resolutions

2 8

Series II: Court Cases

Box Folder

Benkeser vs. Dekalb County Board of Education

2 9

Brewer vs. West Irondequiot Central School District

2 10

Capacchione vs. Charlotte Mecklenburg Board of Education

Box Folder

1997

2 11

1998

2 12

1999 Jan

2 13

1999 Apr-Jun

2 14

1999 Sep

2 15

1999 Oct-Dec

2 16

2000 Mar 2

2 17

2000 Mar 31

2 18

2000 May

2 19

2000 Nov-Dec

2 20

2001 Jan

2 21

2001 Sep

2 22

2001 Oct

2 23

2001 ?

2 24

Articles (see also "Media Articles, 1999 May-Jun" below)

2 25

Memos

3 1

Miscellaneous

3 2

Resolution

3 3

Rulings

3 4
Box Folder

Eisenberg vs. Montgomery County P.S.

3 5

Hoke County Board of Education vs. State of North Carolina (a.k.a. Leandro)

3 6

Missouri vs. Liddell

3 7

Neumyer vs. Lynn School Committee

3 8

Rodriguez vs. Texas

3 9

Swann vs. CMBE 1971

3 10-11

Series III: Media Articles

Box Folder

1988

3 12

1989

3 13

1996 Nov-Dec

3 14

1996 Dec

3 15

1997 Feb, Apr

3 16

1997 Nov

3 17

1998

3 18

1999 Jan-Apr

3 19

1999 May

3 20

1999 May-Jun (contains newspaper clippings concerning CMS and CMBE court cases)

3 21

1999 Oct-Nov

3 22

1999 Nov

3 23

1999 Nov-Dec

3 24

1999 Dec-2000 Feb

3 25

2000 Jan-Feb

3 26

2000 Feb

4 1

2000 Apr-May

4 2

2000 Jun

4 3

2000 Jul-Oct

4 4

2001 Jan-Apr

4 5

2001 Jun

4 6

2001 Jul

4 7

2001 Jul 7-20

4 8

2001 Jul 21-Aug

4 9

2001 Aug

4 10

2001 Aug

4 11

2001 Sep

4 12

2001 Sep-Oct

4 13

2001 Oct

4 14

2001 Oct

4 15

2001 Nov

4 16

2001 Nov-Dec

4 17

2001 Dec

4 18

2001 Dec

4 19

2002 Jan

5 1

2002 Jan

5 2

2002 Jan

5 3

2002 Feb

5 4

2002 Feb

5 5

2003

5 6
Box Folder

Series IV: Media Briefing Packet

5 7

Series V: Media Releases

5 8

Series VI: People

Box Folder

Bush, President George

5 9

Houk, Annelle

5 10

James, Bill

5 11

Simmons, Kenneth

5 12

Simmons, Robert

5 13
Box Folder

Series VII: Requests for Information

5 14-18

Series VIII: Schools (schools in the CMS system, listed by name)

Box Folder

Albemarle Road Elementary School

5 19

Amay James Elementary School

5 20

Ashley Park Elementary School

5 21

Bain Elementary School

5 22

Berryhill Elementary School

5 23

Billingsville Montesorri

5 24

Chantilly Elementary School

5 25

Cotswold Elementary School

5 26

Covenant Academy

5 27

Dilworth Elementary School

5 28

East Mecklenburg High School

5 29

Eastover Academy

5 30

Eastway Middle School

5 31

Garinger High School

5 32

Hawthorne Traditional Middle School

5 34

Hidden Valley Elementary School

5 35
Box Folder

Greenway Park Elementary School

5 33

Highland Elementary

5 36

Independence High School

5 37

Irwin Avenue Open School

5 38

Lansdowne Elementary School

5 39

Long Creek Elementary School

5 40

Morgan School

5 41

Morehead Elementary School

5 42

Myers Park High School

5 43

Myers Park International Baccalaureate

5 44

Nations Ford Road Elementary School

5 45

Newell Elementary School

5 46

Olympic High School

5 48

Paideia Academy

5 49

Paw Creek Elementary School

5 50

Randolph Middle School

5 51

Ransom Middle School

5 52

Reid Park International Academy

5 53

Sedgefield Middle School

5 54

Selwyn Elementary School

5 55

Shamrock Gardens Elementary School

5 56

Sharon Elementary School

5 57

Smithfield Elementary School

5 58

West Charlotte High School

5 59

West Mecklenburg High School

5 60

Wilson Middle School

5 61

Windsor Park Elementary School

5 62

Winterfield Elementary School

5 63

Series IX: Subject Files

Box Folder

A+ Plan

6 1

ABCs of Public Education

6 2-3

Academic Achievement Students

6 4

Academic Standards

6 5

Achievement 2000: Excellence for a New Millennium

6 6

Advanced Placement

6 7

At-Risk students

6 8

Audit of Educational Effectiveness

6 9

Autism

6 10

AVID Program

6 11

Balanced Scorecard

6 12

Basic Education Plan

6 13

Beating the Odds II

6 14

Behavior Guidelines

6 15

Blue Sheets

6 16

Bonds

6 17

Bright Beginnings, ELS, Exceptional Children, Self-contained Sites

6 18

Building Dreams

6 19

Building Services (see also "Schools-Building data")

6 20

Buses

6 21

Business and education

6 22

Busing (see also "Closest School policies," Integration," De-Segregation," and "Segregation")

6 23-24

California Achievement Test

6 25

Capacity

6 26-27

Capital Improvement Projects

6 28-29

Capital Needs Assessments

6 30

Capital Needs Assessments, 2004-2005

6 31

Center City schools

6 32

Certified Headcount for Special Education

6 33

Charlotte Mecklenburg Education Foundation

6 34

Children's Educational Outcomes

6 35

Choice Plan

6 36

Cities in School

6 37

Citizens for Effective Government

6 38

City-County School Board Luncheon, December 17, 1996

6 39

Closest School policies (see also "Busing")

6 40

Comparative Analysis

6 41

Cost Per Seat (COPS)

6 42

Council of Urban Boards of Education

6 43

Current Classroom Count -- by School

6 44

Davidson School Controversy

6 45

Demographics (see also "Race")

6 46

De-segregation (see also "Busing," "School Desegregation Jurisprudence," "Integregation," "Re-segregation," and "Segregation")

6 47

De-segregation

7 1-4

De-segregation, articles about

7 5-6

Discipline, articles about (see also "Spanking")

7 7

District Meeting Lists

7 8

District Profile (see also "Profile of the CMS," and "School Profile Summary")

7 9

Drop-out Issue

7 10

Drug Abuse

7 11

Economy in Charlotte/Mecklenburg

7 12

Educate!

7 13

Education Mission Statement

7 14

Educational Opportunities

7 15

EIS

7 16

Election campaigns

7 17-18

Elementary Curriculum Review Report

7 19

Elementary Magnet Program Locations

7 20

Elementary Schools

7 21

Encounter TD Enrollment

7 22

End-of-Grade Test results, 1993-94

7 23

End-of-Grade Test results, 1994-95

7 24

End-of-Grade Test results, 1995-96

7 25

End-of-Grade Test results, 1996-97

7 26

End-of-Grade Test results, 1997-98

7 27

End-of-Grade Test results, 1998-99

7 28

End-of-Grade Test results, 1999-00

7 29

End-of-Grade Test results, 2000-01

7 30

End-of-Grade Test results, 2001-02

7 31

End-of-Grade Test results, 2002-03

7 32

End-of-Grade Test results, 2003-04

7 33

English as a Second Language (see also "Limited English Proficiency")

7 34

Enrollment projections

7 35

Equitable Educational Opportunity

7 36

Equity

7 37-38
Box Folder

Equity Allotments

7 39

Equity Balanced Scorecards

7 40

Equity Class Size

7 41

Equity Information, 2001-2002

7 42

Equity Mobility Rate

7 43

Equity Plus

7 44

Exceptional Children

7 45

Exceptional Children, Self-Contained Sites

7 46

Exchange Student Programs

7 47

Families United for North Mecklenburg Education

8 1

Financial Projections

8 2

Financial Support

8 3

First in America

8 4

First Ward-Recollections of Yesterday

8 5

Foreign Languages in the Elementary Schools

8 6

Foundations for Success

8 7

Free-Reduced Lunch Program

8 8-9

Future Capital Funding

8 10

Generalized Land-Use Plan

8 11

Geo-coded Student Population

8 12

Goals (see also "Vision/Goals")

8 13

Goals 2001

8 14-15

Goals 2005-2006

8 16

Governing America's Schools: Changing the Rules

8 17

Graduation Requirement Exhibit

8 18

Grier Heights Economic Foundation

8 19-20

Growth Planning (see also "Student population projections")

8 21

Growth Planning, articles about

8 22

Head Start

8 23

Helping Empower Local People (HELP)

8 24

History Curriculum

8 25

History of CMS

8 26

Home Rule

8 27

Home School Zones (see also "Boundaries")

8 28

Inclement Weather Policy

8 29

Inside CMS

8 30

Integrated Neighborhoods

8 31

Integration (see also "Desegregation," "Resegregation," and "Segregation")

8 32

Intel International Science and Engineering Fair

8 33

International Baccalaureate

8 34

JFAC

8 35

Lead Teacher: Ways to Begin

8 36

League of Women Voters

8 37

Legacy, The

9 1

Legislative Priorities

9 2

Limited English Proficiency (see also "English as a Second Language")

9 3

Local Accountability Bonus Program

9 4

Long Range School Facilities Master Plan

9 5-6

Magnet Schools (see also "Non-Magnet Schools")

9 7-8

Magnet Schools, articles about

9 9

Major challenges

9 10

Mathematics curriculum

9 11

Mecklenburg County

Box Folder

Commission

9 12

Budget

Box Folder

1997

9 13

2002-03

9 14

2004-05

9 15-16

Park and Recreation Dept.

9 17

Membership statistics (see also "Enrollment")

Box Folder

1992

9 18

1993-94

9 19

1996-97

9 20

1997-98

9 21

1998-99

9 22

1999-00

9 23

2000-01

9 24

2001-02

9 25

2002-03

9 26
Box Folder

Memoranda

9 27

Mental Health of Students

9 28

Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA)

9 29

Middle Schools

9 30

Middle School Project Charter Support Team

9 31

Minority, Women, Small Business Enterprise

9 32

Mobile Units

9 33

Multi-Cultural Education

9 34

National Assessment of Educational Progress

10 1

National Council for the Advancement of Education Writing

10 1

National Parent-Teacher Association

10 2

National School Boards Association

10 3

National School Boards Association - CUBE

10 4

No Child Left Behind

10 5-6

Non-Magnet Schools (see also "Magnet Schools")

10 7

No Tolerance Policy

10 8

North Carolina Alliance for Smart Schools

10 9

North Carolina.

10 10
Box Folder

Budget.

10 11

State Board of Education.

10 12
Box Folder

Public School Laws.

10 13

North Mecklenburg Chamber of Commerce

10 14

Notes (typed transcriptions)

10 15

Open Enrollment

10 16

Parental Involvement

10 17

Parents for the Advancement of Gifted Education

10 18

Partners for School Reform

10 19

Plan 74

10 20

Planning Districts

10 21

Planning Workshop, March 7, 2003

10 22-23

Potter, Judge Robert

10 24

Poverty

10 25-26

Pregnancy

10 27

Prepare for Greatness

10 28

Pre-School

10 29

Pride Awards, 2002

10 30

Principal Appraisal System

10 31

Private Schools

10 32

Profile of the CMS (see also "District Profile," and "School Profiles Summary")

10 33

Progress Accountability Portfolio

10 34

Project Charter Curriculum

10 35

Public Opinion

10 36-37

Pupil Assignment (see also "Student assignment")

10 38-39

Race (see also "Demographics")

11 1

Race, articles about

11 2-3

Reading (see also "What's working in Reading")

11 4

Reform Governance in Action

11 5

Report Card (see also oversize)

11 6

Report to the Community

11 7

Re-Segregation (see also "Busing," "De-segregation," "Integration," and "School Desegregation Jurisprudence")

11 8

Safety (see also "Violence")

11 9-10

Save Our Schools

11 11

Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT)

11 12

School Activity Fund Report

11 13

School-Based Management

11 14

School Boundaries

11 15

School Building Data

11 16

School Desegregation Jurisprudence (see also "Busing," "De-Segregation," "Integration," "Re-segregation," and "Segregation")

11 17

School Facilities

11 18

School Facilities Master Plan

11 19

School Locations

11 20

School Locations-Harris Houston Road/Hwy 49

11 21

School Profiles Summary (see also "District Profile," and "Profile of the CMS")

11 22

School Reform, articles about

11 23-24

Sedgefield Neighborhood Attendance

11 25

Segregation (see also "Busing," "De-segregation," and "Integration," "Re-Segregation," "School Desegregation Jurisprudence" and "Segregation")

11 26

Social Services, Department of

11 27

Social Workers

11 28

Spanking (see also "Discipline")

11 29

Statistics

11 30

Strategic Framework for Staffing Needy Schools with Quality Teachers and Administrators

11 31

Student Accountability Standards

11 32

Student Assignments (see also "Pupil Assignment")

11 33-35
Box Folder

Appeals

11 36

Changes

11 37

Lottery

11 38

Lottery Results

11 39

Policies

11 40-41

Reassignments

11 42

Requests for Reassignment

11 43

Student Assignments, articles about

11 44-45

Student Population, 1999-2000 (see also "Demographics")

11 46

Student Population Projections-Planning 2002

11 47

Student Rights and Responsibilities Handbooks

11 48

Student Survey, 2002-2003

12 1

Students with High Intellectual Potential (SHIP)

12 2

Summary of Professional Organizations Requests

12 3

Surveys

12 4

Targeted Schools

12 5

Taxation

12 6

Teacher

Box Folder

Recruitment

12 7

Retention

12 8

Statistics

12 9

Survey 2004

12 10
Box Folder

Technical High School

12 11

Template for Schools with a High Concentration of Low Economic Status Students

12 12

Temporary Aid to Needy Families

12 13

Test Results (see also "End-of-Grade Test Results")

12 14

Theory of Action

12 15

Title I Evaluation

12 16

To Be Rather than to Seem

12 17

Total Quality Education

12 18

Twentieth Day Enrollment data

12 19

Unitary Schools

12 20

Unitary Status

12 21

Urban School Boards

12 22

Vacancy Announcements

12 23

Violence (see also "Safety")

12 24

Vision

12 25

Vision/Goals 2001 (see also "Goals")

12 26-29

Web Site, 2001

12 30

What's Working Conference

12 31

What's Working in Reading II

12 32

World Class Schools

12 33

Writing (see also "Reading")

12 34

Series X: Superintendents

Box Folder

Relic, Peter 1987-1991

12 35-36

Murphy, John 1991-1996

12 37

Smith, Eric J. 1996-

12 38-40

Superintendent Recruitment & Evaluation

12 41

North Mecklenburg High School

5 47